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Chidham and Hambrook - More Organisations - Chichester District Council

Chichester District Council -
matters of interest to Chidham and Hambrook residents
link to the Chichester District Council Website

Current representation on the District Council
Councillors for the Bosham ward, which includes Chidham and Hambrook:
Myles Cullen
Five Oaks
Woodmancote Lane
Woodmancote
Emsworth Hampshire
PO10 8RB
Tel: 01243 573850
mcullen@chichester.gov.uk
Penny Plant
Glebe House
Walton Lane
Bosham
Chichester, West Sussex
PO18 8QB
Tel: 01243 575031
pplant@chichester.gov.uk

ICIS helps people of all ages in West Sussex find information about services offering support, care or advice. ICIS is a free and confidential service providing impartial and up-to-date information.
Tel: 01903 859928

Local Plan submitted  
New partnership for dog warden service 4/14
Financial support for flood victims 3/14
Local Plan moves one step closer 10/13
The next steps in the Local Plan 10/13
Council listens to feedback on Local Plan 7/13

Communities in the Chichester District offered share of nearly £500,000

7/13
History comes alive as The Novium celebrates its first birthday

7/13

Could you run Chichester’s first dedicated High Street store for local producers? 4/13
New technology is transforming the lives of those with dementia 4/13

Local residents encouraged to have their say on Local Plan

3/13
Affordable Housing in Lion Park (Broad Rd Hambrook)

11/12

Communities asked their views on rural car parks 10/12
Careline smoke detector unit helps to save woman's life 1/12
District Council Election Results May 2011 5/11
Zero tolerance on dog mess 3/11


Dog owners across Chichester District urged to take note of new microchipping laws

Reuniting lost or stolen dogs with their owners will become much easier soon thanks to new legislation coming into force this spring. Dog Wardens at Chichester District Council are urging owners to ensure their canine buddies are microchipped by 6 April. From this date all dogs must be microchipped by law.
The rules apply to any dog aged over eight weeks and breeders will be responsible for microchipping puppies before they are sold. In addition, owners are also expected to ensure that their dogs are wearing an identity tag with the owner's address details when in public places. And as well as having their pet microchipped, it will also be compulsory for the microchip details to be kept up-to-date with the dog owner's current details i.e. where the dog normally lives.
Only an authorised person such as a vet or someone who has completed an approved training course is allowed to microchip a dog and owners are urged to look online at www.dogsttrust.org.uk for information.
“Our Dog Wardens deal with numerous cases of lost and straying dogs each year and microchipping will really help many more people be reunited with their best friends,” says Councillor Roger Barrow, Cabinet Member for Environment at Chichester District Council. “Lots of people have already had their dogs microchipped but we just want to remind those people who have not yet done so that the change in law is just around the corner. As a district of dog lovers, I would urge all owners to ensure the details are kept up-to-date so we can see more happy endings if dogs go astray.”
The council's Dog Wardens carry scanners with them so they can check to see if a dog has a microchip. If a dog does go missing the owner needs to inform the council's Dog Warden service and the microchip data base company where the pet is registered. Forms can be found online with the company where the dog registered.
For more information about microchipping see www.chichester.gov.uk/dogcontrol   and www.dogtrust.org.uk/help-advice/microchipping
For more information or for a form to update a dog's microchip details please contact Dog Control on 01243 534734 or email contact@chichester.gov.uk
Last year the number of stray dogs seized by the council's Dog Wardens halved compared to 2014 although around 30% of the strays seized remain unclaimed. The council's Dog Wardens make every effort to rehome any unclaimed strays and last year placed more than 31 dogs with rescue societies. One of the lucky dogs rehomed last year was Buddy. The Jack Russell terrier was so hungry and malnourished he ate a quantity of plastic bags and other debris. He was found straying in the Witterings area. Council dog wardens took Buddy to RSPCA Mount Noddy at Eartham where he was cared for until he recovered. Buddy wasn't microchipped and he was rehomed with a loving family.

Local Plan submitted

Chichester Local Plan – a plan to provide for new jobs and homes in the district outside the South Downs National Park up until 2029 – is to be submitted to the Government for independent examination.

At Chichester District Council's Full Council meeting on Thursday 24 April, councillors voted to submit the plan to the Secretary of State.

Councillors heard how the plan seeks to provide new homes and jobs that will allow the area to continue to prosper while protecting the special character of the area, in particular the countryside and the coast, the history and heritage of the area and the nature of the communities it will cover.

The council will now submit the plan to Government. The Secretary of State will then appoint an independent planning inspector to carry out an examination of it. This will include holding a series of public hearings, which are anticipated later this year.

Already the plan has made progress in:

· helping to secure new investment in waste water management with a new UV system in place at Apuldram;

· proposals for a new waste water treatment works at Tangmere; and,

· successfully bidding for investment in feasibility works for much needed improvements to the road network from the Department of Transport.

Throughout the consultation process, the council has invited the views of local residents and businesses and it has altered the plan to reflect some of the key comments. These include:

· the introduction of an AONB policy to recognise the importance of the harbour and surrounding communities.

· changes to the shape and size of the strategic sites.

· more work on providing green infrastructure.

· publishing the number of gypsy and traveller pitches needed in the district for both short and long term occupation.

· balancing the needs of the existing community with that of the future, while having limited land to accommodate growth.

During the public consultations , over 8,700 comments were submitted. The 477 comments made in the latest round of consultation earlier this year will be considered by the independent planning inspector who will decide whether the plan is sound and deliverable.

Councillor Heather Caird, Leader of Chichester District Council, says : “This has been one of the most difficult pieces of work the council has ever delivered. It was always going to be difficult to find the right balance between protecting our beautiful district and delivering sufficient housing for the future. However, we believe we have achieved this through careful planning and consideration.

“An adopted plan is important as it means that we can control planning decisions that will protect our outstanding environment. It sets a clear framework for development for the next 15 years, as well as the infrastructure that will be needed to service it. It is widely recognised that the council has been vulnerable to speculative development for some time as a result of not having an adopted Local Plan and a five year housing land supply.”

Councillor Tony Dignum, Cabinet Member for Finance, added that the plan represented a fair balance between meeting housing need and protecting the area's distinct environmental heritage.

“We needed to recognise the shortage of housing, both nationally and locally, which has been aggravated by much lower rates of house-building during the recession.  In addition, substantial population growth is forecast over the 15-year period of the Plan and any Government is likely to put a very high priority on increasing the rate of house-building. The Plan sets out to accommodate these pressures and meet the clear local need for new homes in the most acceptable way.”

Councillor Andrew Smith, Chairman of the Planning Committee, says: “The housing number proposed in the Plan is realistic given the constraints facing the District Council. To provide for significantly fewer would have social and economic consequences given the affordability of buying or renting housing in the area. Once the Local Plan is in place the council will also be able to access further funding for infrastructure through introducing the Community Infrastructure Levy, to support projects needed by local communities.”

Although an independent inspector will have the final say on whether the plan is sound, the council has tried to listen to what everyone has said and has made some significant adaptions thanks to the input from local residents and businesses. The council believes this is the best plan for the area as a whole.

Cllr Caird concludes by saying: “I would like to thank everyone who has taken part in this important piece of work. You are helping us to protect the district for future generations.”

For information on the Plan see www.chichester.gov.uk/newlocalplan or contact the council's Planning Policy team on 01243 534571 or email at planningpolicy@chichester.gov.uk .

New partnership for dog warden service

Chichester District Dog Wardens have teamed up with kennels located in Hambrook to provide the out of hours' service for stray dogs from 1 May.

The Dog Wardens will carry out their normal duties between 9am and 5pm, Monday to Friday. However, any strays found between 5pm and 9pm Monday to Friday or between 9am and 9pm at the weekends, will be dealt with by Amberley Kennels in Hambrook.

Any dogs found during normal working hours will also be placed at Amberley Kennels, until they are reunited with their owner, or a new owner is found.

If someone finds a stray dog they have a legal duty to report it. If this occurs out of hours, they must take it to Amberley Kennels in Hambrook; they can hold onto the dog until the Dog Wardens are back on duty; or if they know who the dog belongs to, they can return the dog to its owner.

“This is a minor change to the service,” says Cllr John Connor, Cabinet Member for the Environment at Chichester District Council. “The main difference is that if someone finds a stray dog at night or during the weekend from 1 May, they will have to take any stray dogs to Hambrook rather than Chichester. We will shortly no longer have our own kennels and will use the ones at Hambrook instead. The phone number remains the same and people should continue to call 01243 785166.

“We also want to remind people of the importance of micro-chipping their dog and making sure they have a tag on. This can save a lot of distress for both the dog and its owners if the dog goes missing.”

 

Financial support for flood victims

Following the recent winter storms in the district, Chichester District Council is highlighting the financial support that is available to those affected by flooding.

A number of schemes to help businesses and homeowners recover from flooding since 1 December 2013 have been announced by the Government:
· The Repair and Renew Grant. All homeowners and businesses that have suffered flood damage between 1 December 2013 and 31 March 2014 may be eligible for a grant. Grants will be available to fund measures that will improve a property ' s resilience or resistance to flooding over and above and not duplicating repairs that are normally covere d by insurance. Full details about how this fund will operate have not been released by Government and more information will be available on our website as soon as the details are finalised.
· Business Rates Flooding Relief. Business properties that have bee n flooded may be eligible for 100% business rate relief for three months. Eligible business properties that have been flooded on any day between 1 December 2013 and 31 March 2014 are entitled to apply.
· Council Tax Discounts. Council Tax discounts are available to homeowners whose homes have been flooded at any time between 1 December 2013 and 31 March 2014.
· Business Support Scheme. The Government has provided funding to Chichester District Council to offer one-off grants to s mall and medium sized businesses that have been affected by flooding since 1 December 2013. Eligible businesses for this grant are those that have suffered hardship and significant loss of trade as a result of flooding.

Councillor Tony Dignum, Cabinet Mem ber for Finance at Chichester District Council, says: “We recognise that, in many cases, sorting out the damage caused by flooding is as traumatic as the actual event itself. It is important that residents affected by these problems know what financial su p port is available to them. We are keen to make sure the application process is straightforward and that the benefit quickly gets to where it is most needed."

If your home or business property is within the Chichester District and has been affected by floo ding since 1 December 2013 and you think you may be eligible for one or more of the above schemes, please see our website www.chichester.gov.uk and complete an ‘ Expression of Interest Form ' or contact the counci l on 01243 534512.

Local Plan moves one step closer

Chichester District Council's Local Plan moved a step closer to being submitted to the Planning Inspectorate, after councillors agreed that the Plan was ready for its final round of public comment.

The public will be asked a series of questions about the Plan. This is the final stage that the Plan has to go through before it is submitted to an Inspector. This will take place between 8 November 2013 and 6 January 2014.

Following this, the Plan will be subject to a public examination, held by an Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State. The Inspector is required to consider whether the plan has been prepared in accordance with the relevant regulations and is ‘sound'. All the comments made now will be sent to the Inspector to assist this process.

“We have moved one step closer to taking back control of planning decisions on behalf of our communities”, says Cllr Heather Caird, Leader of Chichester District Council.

“It is widely recognised that the council has been vulnerable to speculative development for some time as a result of not having an adopted Local Plan and a five year housing land supply.

However, I feel confident that we are nearly there.

“Any further delays for the Plan just make us vulnerable to development of the wrong sort. We want the Plan to set a clear framework for development for the next 15 years, as well as the infrastructure that will be needed to service it.

“We appreciate the efforts of all of those who have taken the time to comment on the Plan and got involved in this process. Although we are unable to make all of the changes suggested, we have made some significant adaptions thanks to the input from our local residents and businesses. We all want to protect the areas most precious to our communities, protect heritage and landscape assets, as well as habitats and the Plan seeks to achieve this.”

Once the Local Plan is in place the council will also be able to access further funding through introducing the Community Infrastructure Levy, to support projects needed by local communities.

Already the Plan has made progress in:
· securing new investment in waste water management with a new UV system in place at Apuldram;
· proposals for a new treatment works at Tangmere; and,
· successfully bidding for investment in feasibility works for much needed improvements to the road network from the Department of Transport.

Throughout the consultation process, the council has continued to seek the views of local residents and businesses and it has altered the plan to reflect some of the key comments. These include:

· the introduction of an AONB policy to recognise the importance of the harbour and surrounding communities.
· changes to the shape and size of the strategic sites.
· more work on green infrastructure and more will be done to protect the land needed for cycle lanes once more consultation has been carried out.
· publishing the number of gypsy and traveller pitches needed in the district for both short and long term occupation and more work will follow on identifying sites.
· balancing the needs of the existing community with that of the future, while having limited land to accommodate growth.

“We now have more people involved in planning than ever before,” adds Heather. “Nineteen communities are taking Government at its word and planning for themselves through Neighbourhood Plans.

“In addition, we are now looking at priorities for next year and high on the list is the master planning for the large strategic sites. We will again be encouraging the community to get involved in this discussion about the details of the proposals and to help us shape them.

“All of this is incredibly positive. Both the staff and Members of the council are committed to making sure that we bring people together around a new vision for the district, that we can all play a part in.”

Chichester Local Plan: Key Policies Pre-submission 2014-2029 and all of the supporting documents are available for inspection on the council's website at www.chichester.gov.uk/newlocalplan or to request a paper copy to be sent to you, for a charge, please contact the council's Planning Policy team on 01243 534571 or email at planningpolicy@chichester.gov.uk . Alternatively, paper copies can be viewed at Chichester District Council at East Pallant House in Chichester and our area offices at Midhurst and Selsey during office hours. Copies are also in all the district's libraries.

The next steps in the Local Plan

Earlier this year hundreds of you put forward your views on Chichester's draft Local Plan as part of a district-wide consultation.

The Plan is important because it is the blueprint that will guide development across the district over the next 15 years. It covers Chichester, Selsey and the many villages and parishes that make up the Chichester District outside the South Downs National Park. A number of parishes are also looking to prepare neighbourhood plans which will support the implementation of the Local Plan.

Your views have been considered and some revisions have been made to the Plan as a result.

The consultation revealed that people wanted a redistribution of the number of homes built across the 15 year period, more emphasis on the way in which we protect important habitats in the district and changes to strategic site boundaries.

Between November and the beginning of January we want you to tell us if you believe the revised plan meets Government guidelines.

After this the Plan will be subject to a Public Examination held by an Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State. The Inspector is required to consider whether the plan has been prepared in accordance with the relevant regulations and is 'sound'.

To find out how you can your say or for more information on the Local Plan process, please visit www.chichester.gov.uk/newlocalplan , email ldf@chichester.gov.uk or call 01243 534571.

Council listens to feedback on Local Plan

Councillors at Chichester District Council have thanked residents for taking part in their consultation on the Local Plan, and now want to hear people's views on the changes they have made.

Councillors attending the Full Council meeting on Tuesday 23 July overwhelmingly supported the changes proposed, following feedback from residents.

“We want to thank everyone who took part in our consultation on the Local Plan,” says Cllr Heather Caird, Leader of Chichester District Council.

“We have taken time to consider the feedback received, and adapted the plan accordingly. We now want to give residents a further chance to provide their views on the main elements of policy that have changed.”

Further consultation will now take place between Friday 26 July and Monday 16 September (closing at 9am). Additional time has been given because the consultation falls during the summer holidays. Local people can get involved by visiting www.chichester.gov.uk/newlocalplan , placing their comments on chichester-consult.limehouse.co.uk/portal , emailing ldf@chichester.gov.uk or calling 01243 534571.

The main changes include:

Redistributing the number of homes built across the 15 year period.
The overall housing numbers will not change – they will just be spread evenly over the 15 years that the plan covers. The community is keen that new housing is supported by infrastructure. Rephasing development will help to help to achieve this.

Placing additional emphasis on the way in which we protect important habitats in the district, including Pagham Harbour.
Along with local communities, the council recognises the importance of protecting these areas for both environmental and economic reasons. Current policies already cover this, but in response to feedback, the council has now created a specific policy on Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Changes to strategic site boundaries
There have been a number of changes that reflect the concerns of residents, including more landscaping; and protecting natural assets of sites, as well as boundaries. The council will want to bring interested parties together in each of the three key locations and discuss how the changes can meet local aspirations.

To agree the number of pitches required for gypsies and travellers over the period of the plan.
Although the council has consulted on the needs of gypsies and travellers, they were waiting on further research to confirm the number of pitches needed locally. At present, it does not address the need for a solution for the travelling community that have been seen visiting the area in recent years. This is subject to further work which will be completed in September.

Further comments have been received on the Chichester Ship Canal. Councillors want the opportunity to review this further and are planning to debate this at Full Council in September.

The Local Plan will shape how the district develops (except those areas that fall within the South Downs National Park) over the next 15 years. The South Downs National Park Authority will create its own Local Plan for the rest of the district that falls within its boundaries.

“People often think that the Local Plan is just about housing – but it's not. It's about protecting the character and beauty of the district; providing job and housing opportunities so that our children can continue to live and work locally; supporting and helping to boost the local economy; and making sure that we have adequate services, travel options and community facilities,” says Heather.

“This is our chance to make sure that our district has a bright future, with a strong economy, and a thriving working age population. There is not the option to stand still. Without the Local Plan we will have development thrust upon us, and we won't be able to manage its size, or its location. With a plan we can manage where and how this happens. Without a plan we will also not be able to access vital funds to support facilities for our communities.”

“We continue to welcome the views of local residents and would like to encourage them to get involved in this process. We realise that people may have different views, but we will weigh everything up before presenting a plan that takes account of all of the issues later in the year.”

Communities in the Chichester District offered share of nearly £500,000

Communities within the Chichester District that have taken new development are being offered a share of nearly £500,000 to spend on projects to improve their areas.

The funding, which has been made available as part of the government's New Homes Bonus scheme, will see £450,000 made available to communities across the Chichester District.

The amount of money now made available per parish is dependent upon the number of new homes that have been occupied in the period April 2010 to March 2013. Parish, town and city councils are now invited to apply for a share of the funding by Tuesday 1 Oct ober 2013.

Money will be awarded to projects that can demonstrate the impacts of development, aim to enhance the local area and benefit the whole community.

Councillor Tony Dignum, Cabinet Member for Finance at Chichester District Council, says: “As a council we have endeavoured to protect this money for the benefit of those communities that have taken new development. This funding offers a unique opportunity to invest in important facilities and activities that will support our local communities for years to come.

“The government wants to see more housing delivered. However, it has acknowledged that this can bring associated problems so has passed additional funding to local councils to help communities address these concerns. This, along with new neigh bourhood planning powers, is giving people more say at a local level to target issues of concern. Our emerging Local Plan has this at its core.”

Communities that have taken significant numbers of new homes include: Boxgrove, Chidham and Hambrook, Fishbourne, Funtington, Lavant, Linchmere, Petworth, Selsey, Tangmere, Westbourne and Westhampnett. Chichester City has taken 40% of all new homes in the district. Other parishes have seen more modest levels of development, but can still make the case for support for projects that bring benefit to their communities.

If residents have ideas for how this funding could be spent, they should contact their local parish, town or city council.

History comes alive as The Novium celebrates its first birthday

Romans, Normans, Georgians and First World War soldiers will help The Novium celebrate its first birthday on Monday 8 July.

Museum staff dressed in costumes from different periods of history will greet visitors and take to the streets of Chichester city centre to hand out balloons.

The first 20 visitors to The Novium on Monday will receive a free goody bag.

Look out for more fantastic giveaways on The Novium ' s social media sites including the chance to win two annual family passes and discounts off admission.

Since last July, museum staff have been busy welcoming lots of visitors keen to find out about the history of the district.

The museum has also won a number of national awards. They include a Civic Trust Award which recognises exemplar new build projects within a conservation area; and the RICS (Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors) award, which recognises the museum ' s work with the community. The building was also shortlisted for a RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) Award.

Councillor Eileen L intill, Chichester District Council ' s Cabinet Member for Leisure, Wellbeing and Community Services, says: “The museum has already inspired children from primary school age to university students through its learning programme. A recent example of this is t he artwork on display by University of Chichester fine art course students.

“The district has a rich history and we are pleased the musuem is able to showcase so many objects. What also makes the museum so special is that it balances the contemporary and the historic and this has been demonstrated the variety of awards that the museum has won.

“The Novium plays a key role in helping to attract tourists to the whole of the area through its Tourist Information Centre, which is located in the museum. We are hoping that the museum will continue to grow as a key attraction and tell the district ' s story for years to come.”

Visitors can explore the story of the district over the past 500,000 years. The remains of Chichester's Roman bath house dominate the ground floor. These have been uncovered for the public to see for the first time.

The museum service has about 50 0 ,000 artefacts, both on display, and in store. Among the many other fascinating exhibits inclu de the Chilgrove Mosaic and the Jupiter Stone, a portion of Roman sculpture base dated between the late first and early third century AD.

There are also events and activities for the whole family throughout the year and tourist information facilities on s ite.

The Novium contains a shop with a wide range of local and unique gifts, souvenirs, books, and the city's Tourist Information Centre.

The Novium, in Tower Street in Chichester, is open:

· Summer: Monday to Saturday 10am- 5pm, Sunday 10am-4pm; and,

· Wi nter: Tuesday to Saturday 10am to 5pm, Sunday 10am-4pm.

Admission fee applies. Access to Chichester Tourist Information Centre is free.

Could you be the person to run Chichester's first dedicated High Street store for local producers?

Chichester will soon have a High Street store dedicated to selling loca l produce – and the hunt is on for someone to take on the lease.

The scheme, thought to be the first of its kind in the country, has been introduced by Chichester District Council and West Sussex County Council to support local businesses. It is hoped tha t it will encourage people to buy, and discover more about, the high quality of food that is produced locally. 

The project was given the go-ahead after local producers said that a presence within the High Street would be the best way to support them to grow their businesses. They also believe this will complement the city ' s regular Farmers ' Markets.

Chichester District Council is now looking for an innovative individual or company to lease 29a South Street to sell local produce from the district and sur rounding areas. Applicants will be expected to prove that they have good retail experience, financial strength and a good business plan to make sure that the shop meets the project ' s aims.

To help kick-start the new business, West Sussex is investing £70,000 of funding to fit out the shop. An additional £5,000 is also available to provide assistance to local producers, who require help in supplying the shop.

The project reflects many of the id eas highlighted in ‘ From Field to Fork ' - a recent study from The Campaign to Protect Rural England. The report shows that three times the number of jobs are supported, when people buy from smaller independent local food outlets.

 “Our area has some of t he best local produce in the country and we should be celebrating and promoting this,” says Cllr Myles Cullen, Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for the Economy, Property and Tourism at Chichester District Council.

“We asked local producers how they would like us to support them and their answer was to have a presence on the High Street. By working with West Sussex County Council on this project we hope to boost the local economy and help small local businesses to grow.

“Local suppliers have so much to off er, including sharing knowledge on what ' s seasonal and the best way to cook and serve food. We hope that by everyone working together, not only will it provide local people with a fantastic new store, but that it will also attract even more visitors to ou r beautiful city.”

If everything goes to plan, it is hoped that the new shop will open by the end of the year.

Jason Burt, Managing Director of Farmhouse Cookery Ltd in Bosham, is excited about the project. He says: “Here at Farmhouse Cookery we ' ve been championing great Sussex produce for over 10 years, not only as ingredients in our cakes but in our distribution service.  To have a dedicated high street presence singing the praises of our county ' s produce is invaluable to small producers like myself. We ' re proud and delighted to be a part of such an initiative and urge our community to support us!”

Caroline Spiby, owner of Caroline ' s Dairy, was one of the people who put forward the idea. She says: “I am delighted that we will all be able to buy local pro duce from a shop in South Street, Chichester.  We are extremely fortunate in this area to have such a wide variety of locally produced fruit, vegetables, cakes, conserves and condiments - not forgetting our ice cream. To have the opportunity to have these in one shop in Chichester is amazing.  We have come this far and now we need the support of the local community to keep the idea going.  Go and see what our area has to offer, you will be pleased!”

Those interested in applying for the lease can find more information and access a downloadable pack from www.chichester.gov.uk/localproduceshop or call 01243 534669.

New technology is transforming the lives of those with dementia

A new piece of technology that can be attached to your house keys is helping to transform the lives of those with dementia.

The Mindme locating device is monitored by Chichester Careline, which is run by Chichester District Council. The service supports those who are vulnerable, 24 hours a day, every day of the year.

Sussex Police has been so impressed with Mindme, that they are funding a number of devices for people with dementia who regularly go missing.

The device, which has already helped to save a number of lives, is a small GPS locator. If a person becomes lost or disorientated, they can be located through a dedicated website by their family, or Chichester Careline. The device sends details of its location to the website every four minutes, and is thought to be the smallest GPS locating device in this country.

A further version has also been created with a button that allows the user to speak directly to Chichester Careline. This version is now being used to provide reassurance to carers; lone workers; those who are recovering from an illness and those who are vulnerable, or at risk.

Gill Stoneham, from Fishbourne in Chichester, who has dementia, started using the Mindme locator after a neighbour found her disorientated and trying to cross the busy A27 roundabout. Her husband, Bernard, heard about the technology through a carers’ support group and this proved to be invaluable.

“Gill regularly walks our dog around the same route in our local village. We had never experienced any problems. However, when she was found by a neighbour trying to cross the busy A27 roundabout, I realised we needed something,” says Bernard.

“The week before, at meeting run by the Carers’ Support West Sussex, the new technology and the services provided by Chichester Careline was discussed. I contacted Chichester Careline to find out about the new Mindme locating device. A member of the team came round to the house the next day and showed us how to use the device. Not only does it indicate position, but in an area with housing it gives the nearest house number and street.

“The very next day, I told Gill not to go too far and to do a short walk. Later, I went to our computer and logged in to make sure that she was taking her normal route. It indicated that she was heading towards the church and car park, which was in the opposite direction to that discussed. She was then stationary in the adjacent field for 11 minutes. I thought perhaps she was playing ball with the dog, but I felt it was best to drive to the church car park just in case. I looked for her over the Fishbourne meadows, where the locator indicated she had been, but there was no sign of her.

“I decided to check the footpath from the church to the main road, and as I did, I passed the entrance to a field where cattle had recently been. The entrance was very muddy and full of water. In the entrance I suddenly saw Gill, lying on the ground stuck in the mud. She was very distressed and had been physically sick. Without the locator I wouldn’t have known where to look for her.

“Since then, we have been given the latest Mindme device with a button that links directly to Chichester Careline. This means that if Gill gets into difficulty, she can speak to the staff through the device. They can then contact me or other nominated persons with her position. All I can say is how grateful I am to have had the use of this piece of hi-tech wizardry and what a difference it makes at this difficult time in our lives.”

According to the Alzheimer’s Society, there are currently 800,000 people with dementia in the UK and there will be over a million people with dementia by 2021. This is becoming a growing problem for the Police, who are regularly called out to help find missing people. Sgt Suzie Mitchell from Sussex Police, believes that this type of technology is the way forward,

“We regularly have to search for missing people with dementia. It is heart breaking to see the torment that their families are put through– and to see the impact it has on the person with dementia when they are found. I know first-hand how hard it can be because one of my family members had dementia. I also know what a difference this technology will make to those with dementia and their families. We are really excited about our involvement in this project and the difference this could make to local people.”

Chichester Careline is the only centre in the country, monitoring the devices. They are able to locate the person if they become lost – regardless of where they are in the world (as long as they have a mobile network). Information on the location of the person will only be provided to the carer or family once a series of security checks have been passed. This same procedure is on the website. The centre, which also monitors lone workers and other vulnerable groups of people, helped to get the idea off the ground.

Cllr Eileen Lintill, Cabinet Member for Leisure, Wellbeing and Community Services at Chichester District Council, can see the difference the devices are making:

“Hundreds of thousands of people across the country have dementia. This solution gives both those with dementia and their families the confidence and reassurance they need. The latest model, also allows customers to speak to us directly by pressing a button.

“This can be used by anyone who wants to maintain their independence, but have the reassurance that someone is always around to help them.”

The devices cost £27.50 per month. This price includes Chichester Careline monitoring the device 24 hours a day, every day of the year, and provides access to the users and carers.

Chichester Careline can be contacted on 01243 778688 or by emailing communitycareline@chichester.gov.uk. Further information about Mindme can be found at www.mindme.co.uk

Posted Apr 25

Local residents encouraged to have their say on Local Plan

Local residents in the Chichester District, who live outside of the South Downs National Park, are being encouraged to have their say on the draft Local Plan.

Chichester District Council's Local Plan will shape how the district develops (except those areas that fall within the South Downs National Park) over the next 15 years. The South Downs National Park Authority will create its own Local Plan for the rest of the district that falls within its boundaries.

The council has created the draft plan based on research and feedback gathered over the past few years. It is now encouraging local residents to get involved and put forward their views between Friday 22 March and Friday 3 May 2013.

“The Local Plan is one of the most important documents for our district as it describes how our communities will appear over the next 15 years (except those in the South Downs National Park),” says Cllr Heather Caird, Leader of Chichester District Council.

“People often think that the Local Plan is just about housing – but it's not. It's about protecting the character and beauty of the district; providing job and housing opportunities so that our children can continue to live and work locally; supporting and helping to boost the local economy; and making sure that we have adequate services, travel options and community facilities.

“This is our chance to work together to make sure that our district has a bright future, with a strong economy, and a thriving working age population. There is not the option to stand still. Without the Local Plan we will have development thrust upon us, and we won't be able to manage its size, or its location. With a plan we can manage where and how this happens. Without a plan we will also not be able to access vital funds to support facilities for our communities.”

“We welcome the views of local residents and would like to encourage them to get involved in this process. We realise that people may have different views, but we will weigh everything up before presenting a plan that takes account of all of the issues.”

The Local Plan will bring many benefits to the district. One is that it will secure affordable housing to help local people to stay local. Martina Jeffs and her family were able to move into a new affordable home built especially for local residents. Martina grew up in West Wittering, but never thought she would be able to live there.

“I'm over the moon with our house. I never thought I'd be able to stay in the village as the house prices are so high here. Being able to move into an affordable house has meant that I can stay in the village I grew up in and my daughter can grow up here too.

“The community has been extended with these new homes and it will benefit the area. Affordable homes help to bring some people back to the area that may have been forced to move away because of the lack of affordable housing. It means that the next generation are going to the local school.”

The Local Plan also supports community facilities. The New Park Community and Arts Association Centre in Chichester is one of a number of community facilities that has benefitted from developers' contributions. Rod Fennell, trustee and project co-ordinator at the New Park Centre in Chichester, says: “We received funding from developers' contributions as part of the overall funding package to upgrade our centre. As an independent charity, major capital fund-raising is always a challenge. This extra funding has allowed us to lever in more money and in doing so to replace an outdated single-storey structure with a purpose-built facility, much earlier than might otherwise have been the case. The community are winners as a result.”

The plan will also support local businesses and create job opportunities. John Hall, from the West Sussex Growers' Association, recognises how important it is in helping local businesses expand.

“The horticultural industry already employs around 5,000 people in the local area and brings £500m into the local economy. It supplies supermarkets across the country with high quality, local produce that people can trust. The Local Plan will help us to prepare for the future and consider how we can build on our current success, which will benefit both the local economy and local people.” 

Work has also already taken place to help to deal with some aspects of the area's local infrastructure. Chichester District Council and West Sussex County Council have recently bid to the Government for funding to bring forward an improvement scheme for the A27. Chichester District Council has also been working hard to address issues around the local waste water facilities which have troubled parts of the district. It is expected that a bid will be submitted by Southern Water to Ofwat (the Water Services Regulation Authority), for investment in improved facilities in the way that waste water is dealt with locally.

Local people can get involved (from Mar 22) by visiting www.chichester.gov.uk/newlocalplan , placing their comments on chichester-consult.limehouse.co.uk/portal , emailing ldf@chichester.gov.uk or calling 01243 534571. Officers from the council will also be attending a series of events across the district, where you can find out more and ask questions. A full list of these, and further information about the Local Plan, can be found at www.chichester.gov.uk/newplan

Affordable Housing in Lion Park
Chichester District Council and Radian (Drum Housing Association) have agreed the terms for the allocation of the first phase of affordable housing to be provided at the Lion Park development at Broad Road, Hambrook.

Chichester District Council is keen to ensure that the local community in Chidham and Hambrook are able to gain the maximum benefit from the scheme and are given the opportunity to secure affordable homes in their area. Phase 1 of the scheme includes:

1 x 2-bedroom flat;

10 x 3-bedroom houses; and,

3 x 4-bedroom houses,

Handovers of this phase to Radian are currently scheduled between January and March 2013. On units where there is a local need, preference will be given to households with a local connection to Chidham and Hambrook. In practice this means that the following units will be advertised with the benefit of a local connection preference:

1 x 2-bedroom flat; and,

6 x 3-bedroom houses.

This is an opportunity for local households to secure housing in the area.
As units become available on later phases, Chichester District Council will provide affordable housing in the development for local households where possible.

Tthe first tranche of the units (which includes the flat and 3 x 3-bedroom houses) is advertised in this week’s Homemove Magazine.
The bidding cycle will close next Wednesday (Dec 4) at 2pm.

Communities asked their views on rural car parks

Chichester District Council is encouraging residents, businesses and parish councils to attend one of six community meetings that will discuss options for future pricing structures in its rural car parks.

In April 2011, the council introduced car parking charges in six of its rural communities, including Selsey, Midhurst, Bracklesham, the Witterings, Petworth and Bosham.

Since then, the council has analysed its figures and found that the money generated is not covering the cost to provide the car parks. It now wants to discuss options with residents, businesses and parish councils on how they would like to see the cost covered. Each community will be looked at separately, with different solutions for each.

Kenrick Garraway, Assistant Director for the Economy at Chichester District Council, wants people to have their say.

“As everyone is aware, all councils are constantly reviewing services so that they are able to deal with reductions in funding from central Government.

“When the council introduced charges in rural car parks, we said that we would not alter the charges for two years. We now need to work with local communities to look at how we should cover the cost of the car parks in the future.

“Each area will have different needs and requirements and so the options will be different to suit their individual requirements. We want to meet with local communities to see what their views are so that we can decide on what the best options are going forward.”

Based on current figures, the collective rural car park operations are resulting in a shortfall of over £120,000 a year. The council now needs to find ways of covering this cost in the future.

Six meetings have been arranged, which will be held between 6pm and 8pm on:

· Monday 5 November – Bosham Centre, for Bosham

· Tuesday 6 November – East Wittering Village Hall, for Bracklesham

· Wednesday 7 November – Selsey Parish Hall Complex, for Selsey

· Thursday 8 November – United Reform Church Hall, for The Witterings

· Tuesday 13 November – Capron House, for Midhurst

· Wednesday 14 November – Leconfield Hall, for Petworth

If you are unable to attend a meeting and want to have your say, please visit our website www.chichester.gov.uk/carparkconsultation . The closing date for responses is Friday 30 November 2012.

Knowing your limits
Christmas and the New Year period is a time to eat, drink and be merry. But when the party season is in full swing, it can be easy to forget not to over-do it

Men should not regularly exceed 3-4 units (2-3 units for women), but many people do not know how much this amounts to. This includes how many units are in a glass of wine or a pint of beer
There are around three units in one large glass of wine or one pint of strong beer.

One unit could be:

  • half pint of regular beer, lager or cider;
  • one 125ml glass of wine (9%);
  • a single measure (25ml) of spirit; or,
  • a small glass of sherry. 

Every year more than 33,000 people are admitted to hospital with alcohol related health problems, and more than 40 people die every day as a result of alcohol in England and Wales. The effects of alcohol on your health will depend on how much you drink. The more you drink, the greater the health risks.

Staying safe and healthy while out drinking has become even easier following changes made to the Licensing Act 2003 last year. The changes require operators of certain licensed premises selling alcohol to make tap water freely available on request. Operators must also make sure their customers are aware of the availability of smaller measures of alcohol.

The new smaller measures are ½ pint of beer or cider; 125ml of still wine in a glass; and, 25ml or 35ml of gin, rum, vodka or whiskey.

Chichester District Council is encouraging everyone to take steps to reduce the risk and to know their own limits when they drink

If you are planning to go out this Christmas and New Year, here are some helpful tips to make sure you stay safe and healthy:

  • eat before you go out, or early in the evening.
  • remember, it's not about saving up your units for the week and having them all in one evening.
  • drink water regularly during the evening and before you go to bed.
  • pace yourself and drink soft drinks in between alcoholic ones – a tonic looks the same with or without vodka.
  • don't try to keep up with friends who drink more than you.
  • take a break for 48 hours after drinking alcohol, to let your body recover.
  • always stay together with your friends, don't leave with or accept a lift from a stranger or someone you have only just met.
  • steer clear of a confrontation. It's not worth the hassle.

For more information on alcohol awareness, please contact Chichester District’s Wellbeing Team on 01243 521041, email health@chichester.gov.uk Or contact the Community Safety Partnership on 01243 534860, email communitysafety@chichester.gov.uk


New Chichester Cabinet and Chairman announced (17th May 2011)

Chichester District Council's new Cabinet was revealed today, at the first Council meeting since the district elections. The new Chairman was also announced.

The Cabinet is:

    • Cllr Heather Caird – Leader and Cabinet Member for Service Provision
    • Cllr Myles Cullen – Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for the Economy, Property and Tourism
    • Cllr Tricia Tull – Cabinet Member for Finance
    • Cllr Eileen Lintill – Cabinet Member for Leisure and Wellbeing
    • Cllr John Connor – Cabinet Member for the Environment
    • Cllr Janet Duncton – Cabinet Member for Housing and Planning
    • Cllr Josef Ransley – Cabinet Member for Corporate Services and Communications

The Chairman and Vice-Chairman are:

    • Cllr Peter Clementson – Chairman
    • Cllr Graham Hicks – Vice-Chairman
District Council Election results
Councillors elected for the Bosham ward, which includes Chidham and Hambrook:
Myles Cullen
Tel: 01243 573850
mcullen@chichester.gov.uk
David Myers
Tel: 01243 572356
dmyers@chichester.gov.uk
Myles Cullen and David Myers would like to thank everyone who voted for them on the 5th May. Even if you did not, they will do their best to represent all electors in Bosham, Chidham and Hambrook, of whatever political persuasion, in matters concerning the District Council.
Councillors elected for the Southbourne ward, which includes Nutbourne:
Bruce Finch
tba
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Robert Hayes
Tel: 01243 371388
rhayes@chichester.gov.uk
Graham Hicks
Tel: 01243 371211
ghicks@chichester.gov.uk
The make up of the Council is now
Conservatives 38
Liberal Democrats 8
Independents 2
Total 48

Zero tolerance on dog mess

Dog owners are being warned to bag and bin their dog's mess or face a £75 on the spot fine.

“We know that the majority of dog owners are responsible and clear up after their pets. However, those who don't, need to be warned that we will not tolerate dog mess,” said Cllr Heather Caird, Deputy Leader and Portfolio Holder for Health at Chichester District Council.

“I am a dog owner myself, and part of that responsibility is to make sure I clean up after my dogs. Leaving dog mess around is a risk to the health of both children and adults besides being very unpleasant - and that is just not acceptable.”

Dog fouling is a major concern to the public and generates many complaints. It can also be linked to health risks including 'toxocara canis'.

Roundworm eggs are found in dog mess, which can easily be picked up by young children. This causes stomach upsets, sore throats, asthma and in rare cases blindness. The eggs can remain active in the soil for many years, long after the dog mess has weathered away.

The council is encouraging residents to inform it if:

    • they have witnessed people leaving dog mess and they know who they are. Any information is protected under the Data Protection Act.
    • they are aware of a hotspot where people consistently offend. We need information we can act on, such as times offenders walk, a description of them, their dog or a vehicle. Our dog wardens will then target this area.   

Residents should call 01243 534604 to report problems with dog mess. The council's Customer Care Centre also sells biodegradable dog bags. These can be purchased for £1.70 for 30 bags.


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